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March 12, 2009

Flashback Friday- The Limits of Magic

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I got a magic set for Christmas in1977.  I adored it, and practiced making a red furry ball disappear into a yellow cup until I was ready to present my act to the family.  It was a huge hit, too.  No one could guess where the ball had gone.  Years later my mom pointed out that no one was watching the actual tricks; they were watching to see when my mustache would fall off.

When I first found this picture I laughed at the mustache, too.  Then I looked more closely and saw several items that I took for granted back then, but which have since attained special meaning.

My mom brought the two black cocktail tables back from Korea.  The tops are a swirly design constructed of Korean coins.  When we were small Aunt Su and I would turn the tables on their sides and pretend they were a space ship.  Today those same tables are in my house, and my boys are just as fascinated my the foreign coins as I was.

You can see a tiny picture on the bookshelf above my hand.  It’s a picture of me and my sisters.  My mom was always dressing us up in pastel dresses and putting ribbons in our hair and taking us to get our pictures made.

As the years go by I’ll be wearing a dress in one picture, and  Su will wear it in one taken a couple of years later, and Lulu would wear it yet again.  Riding to Olan Mills studio without getting wrinkled was a nuisance at the time.  Once we ran out of gas on the way back and my sisters and I cried in the back seat of the pea-green Chrysler while my mom flagged down a good Samaritan.

Today my sisters and I have these pictures displayed prominently in our homes, a reminder of our shared past and the solidarity we’ve built over the years, especially since my mom passed away.

The chair in the background has been recovered many times, most recently in a cream chenille with tan spots.  If I’d done it it would have turned out Elvis-jungle-room wild.  My mom chose the fabric, though, so it’s tasteful.

The night before my mom went to the hospital to have her cancer surgery, I took Drew and Porter to her house and we hung out with Mom and Lulu, who had flown into town.  Mom always sat in that chair, and she did so that night.  We talked and watched the twins play.  Although the doctor had drained a lot of fluid from her abdomen the previous Friday, by Monday night she was swollen again and sat sideways in the chair, obviously uncomfortable, yet happy to be surrounded by her family.

I’ve always believed that she knew she wasn’t going to make it out of the hospital.

It’s odd how you can take a glimpse into your past and see clues to your future– a picture, a chair– but you have to live those moments to understand the clues and their meaning.  There’s no magic set to help you skip the process of living the tragic parts.  Fortunately, you must live the happy moments as well.

That Monday night was a little bit of both.

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Add your flashback.  Directions and upcoming themes are here.
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Posted by Anne Glamore @ 7:36 pmBlast From the Past,Flashback Friday,Mom11 comments  

February 12, 2009

Flashback Friday: Love, Look At The 2 Of Us

Love, Look At The 2 of Them.

This is how I remember my grandparents.  The picture is from the 1980’s.

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These are my mother’s parents. We were much closer to them than to my father’s parents. We called them Nana and Papa, although everyone else called them Florence and Robert.

Since my mom died, I’ve been the keeper of the boxes of family history. A peek into my grandmother’s boxes revealed that Nana and Papa had a long-lasting romance. Frankly, the letters and pictures are hard to reconcile with my image of them.

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Florence had no brothers or sisters, and she fit the stereotype of the indulged only child. She grew up in Montgomery and was a talented pianist. When she gave a music recital, the paper noted that she was “an accomplished musician and extremely popular.” Nana would cling to that latter phrase throughout the rest of her life. She expected people to wait on her. She often talked about her college days, and how well-loved she was by her friends. I’ve known people like that, who brag about how popular they are, but the only one I loved was my grandmother.

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We don’t know as much about my grandfather, except that he had a brother and a sister.  Robert spent time in the army, traveling the world. This picture was taken around 1927. The ship he’s on is called the USS Meanticut. He was tall and slender and kept that shape throughout his life.

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Robert and Florence were courting by 1934, when they posed for this picture on the deserted beaches of Panama City, Florida. PCB has changed a lot since then. Some of you may call it the Redneck Riviera. It actually looks romantic here, although the bathing attire probably has a lot to do with it.

My grandparents married in 1937. Their engagement notice reveals another of Nana’s obsessions: her lineage.

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She and her mother, referred to as “Big Momma” in an intimidating way, not a snuggly one, wrote about Florence that “paternally and maternally she is of distinguished ancestry.” They pointed out that one of her ancestors had owned a castle and had a statue erected in his memory in Yorktown, Virginia. She was descended from George Washington’s sister. Another forebear, the great Lord Ashley, had written the well-known Shaftesbury Papers. He was also known as the Earl of Shaftesbury, and the Ashley and Cooper rivers in South Carolina were named after him. The engagement notice included the names of all her dead relatives who had fought in the Revolutionary war and a couple who’d fought for the Confederacy.

Nana and Big Momma tried mightily to conjure up some aristocratic relatives for Papa, but the best they could do was to say that he came from the “Beards, Drysdales and Dowies,” who settled in New Jersey, and some French Huguenots who settled in Virginia on land grants. I feel sure that didn’t bother Papa at all.

Regardless of his ancestral shortcomings, Florence and Robert were married, and my mother was born in 1941.

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Florence and Robert tried desperately to have another child, but were unsuccessful. In her later years, each time I was pregnant, Nana would tell me about her miscarriages in excruciating detail. Well into her 80’s, every time she saw a person having a baby, she took it as a personal reminder of her inability to have more than one child. But that’s how she was. She considered how things affected her first.

My grandfather adored my grandmother. At times they were separated while he was in the army. He wrote her letters so gushing they make your heart flutter just to read them, even when you know they are written to another woman.

He writes to  “My adorable wife” and ends with “My Florence, I think of you all during the day and night and am so completely yours. Your devoted husband, Robert.” In between he says things like, “Florence, I miss you greatly. You are worth the world to me.” He thanks her for each letter she sends, worries about her health, asks about my mother – is she talking? Can Florence send pictures?- and dreams of the next time they’ll be together.

In every picture I have of them together, he is gripping her tightly, so she won’t slip away.

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They lived long enough to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. Papa died in 1991, when I was in law school, and Nana lived another twelve years, miserable without him.

That’s the story of their romance.

Of course, there’s a different story, and that’s the story of my relationship with them.

Of all my grandparents, and my parents as well, Papa was the most effusive. He didn’t hesitate to express his feelings and tell you how much he loved you. Even as a child I could see that Nana could be a hypochondriac and that she was spoiled, but he delighted in her every move, catered to her, and assured her that she was the most wonderful creature on the planet.

He was devoted to us as well. He rode a bike most days, and would often ride to our house. He’d slip rubber-bands around the cuffs of his pants so they wouldn’t get caught in the chains, and I thought that was the smartest idea I’d ever heard. He outfitted the bike in other ways, too. He added a basket so he could bring us National Geographic magazines, word puzzles he’d found, or vegetables from the farmer’s market. Because dogs roamed the neighborhood, he cut off a broom handle and attached it with springs to the underside of his handlebars so he could brandish it if a mutt got too aggressive.

After he retired, he didn’t slow down. For years he volunteered for the Red Cross, driving the truck to pick up blood donations.  He taught us how to make his famous peanut brittle and gave it to neighbors or dropped it off at the Red Cross.

Papa believed that the key to success was having plenty of sharp pencils on hand. He installed a pencil sharpener on the inside of our upstairs closet door and made sure we were well-supplied with pencils. He always had plenty himself, which he used until they were shorter than his pinky. When I think of Papa, I smell pencil shavings.

Papa always had something nifty to show us. He taught us how to sit in the sun with a magnifying glass and focus it on a leaf just so, and soon the leaf would smolder and burn.  He explained tic-tac-toe strategies. He’d take apart his hearing aids and demonstrate how they worked.

I included this picture because this is how I remember Papa. When he saw you, he’d bend down to your level and grasp your hand and pat pat pat it hard while he asked about your latest adventure. When you talked to him you felt like you were the only person in the world. I can see why Nana fell apart after he died.

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Nana remained obsessed with popularity and lineage. I might be dating a long-haired pot smoker, but if he could produce papers showing he was descended from George Washington’s sister and that they came from the same people, Nana would have been thrilled about it.

She believed that high-class people had to uphold certain standards. Women should wear their hair off their foreheads so their eyebrows were clearly visible. She’d often say, “You’d be so much more becoming if your hair was shorter in the front.”

Chewing gum was “common.”

My mother hadn’t been asked to join the Birmingham Junior League, as she’d grown up in Montgomery. When I got an invitation and turned it down, Nana took to her bed. She was stunned that a young lady would practice law rather than join a club with the Junior League’s cachet.

I redeemed myself when the twins were born and we named Drew after my grandfather. Nana was ecstatic. She’d smile at the other boys, but she wanted her picture taken with Drew, because he was “her people.”

There was a Western grocery store a mile from my grandmother’s house. She wouldn’t go near it. Instead she drove all the way to the Western grocery store in the heart of the Tiny Kingdom, because that’s where all the people who were somebody went.

When it was time for her to go to a nursing home, she flat-out refused to go to one convenient to my mom’s house, and insisted on a different one miles away, because it attracted “a better class of people.”

My mom managed her well after my grandfather’s death. She was essentially parenting her mother, as so many of us do later in life, but it was impossible for anyone to treat my grandmother with the attention that Big Momma and Papa had lavished on her. My mom was trying to hold a marriage together and spend time with her grandchildren as well. It wasn’t until after my mom died that I realized just how hard it was for her to manage day by day.

My mom and my grandmother died just a couple of years apart.

I think my grandmother would like to be remembered as she is in this picture, or perhaps the one above where she’s in the pink dress. Her hair is swept off her forehead, revealing her eyebrows. She’s happy and smiling, clearly the center of attention, where she was meant to be.

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1. Jo@Mylestones
2. Ladybird (First Timer!!)
3. Misagracie; Love, love, love, love, crazy love…
4. catnip – some wedding pics!
5. Marissa (Wedding Day)
6. Rebecca (Engaged)
7. TheChickadeefeeder (We Met)
8. TheChickadeefeeder (Parents)
9. Andi (how we met)
10. Sir Nottaguy-Imadad
11. Sir Nottaguy-Imadad
12. Brandy
13. pendy (after the blind date)
14. doni@RainbowCreek@Home 30th Anniversary Card
15. bea
16. Observations of an Earthroamer (Kim)

Powered by… Mister Linky’s Magical Widgets.

Posted by Anne Glamore @ 9:26 pmBlast From the Past,Flashback Friday,Mom33 comments  

February 11, 2009

Dog Food In The Dryer

It’s hard to write coherently when things are falling apart all around you. Finn has the flu and is pitiful to behold. A boy who doesn’t have the energy to taunt his younger brothers is sick indeed.

Last night I asked Porter to move the sheets from the washer to the dryer, add a dryer sheet and turn it on. When he did, an enormous rattling commenced. Upon inspection, I found a good handful of dog food twirling in the dryer with the sheets. The dog food was already dry. Using my well-honed CSI skills (I’ve finished Miami and am now onto New York, and why didn’t any of you tell me about that hot Danny Messer?) I deduced that Porter had dropped a pillowcase into the bag of dog food while making the transfer then thrown it in the dryer, oblivious to the kibble adhered to it.

Boys. Teaching them to be self-sufficient is a tine-consuming process. “Check the wet laundry and make sure no strange objects or dog food are stuck on it” has now been added to the laundry check list.

What started as a simple task well before dinner ended with Bill and the boys carousing in the kitchen, waiting on the Pasta Puttanesca to be served. It was a big deal when the Silver Palate cookbooks came out. My mom went nuts cooking dishes that relied on fresh, new ingredients instead of cans of cream of mushroom soup.

Pasta Puttasnesca was a meal that my sisters and I adored, and my boys loved it, too.

PASTA PUTTANESCA

1 lb spaghetti
2 35 oz cans tomatoes
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp oregano
1/8 tsp dried red pepper flakes
1/2 cup black olives, pitted and chopped
1/4 cup drained capers
4 garlic cloves, minced
8 anchovy fillets, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup Italian parsley, chopped
2 T salt

Boil water.  Add salt and pasta.  Cook until al dente.  Drain.
While pasta is cooking, combine tomatoes and olive oil in skillet and bring to boil.  Add remaining ingredients one at a time, stirring frequently
Reduce heat slightly and continue to cook until sauce has thickened to your liking.
Serve immediately over hot pasta.

I use a large can of diced tomatoes and a large can of puree, as I have boys who pick out chunks.  I increase the red pepper flakes and use Greek olives.  I made this a day ahead so I just had to heat up the sauce and boil noodles on a busy night.

Speaking of self-reliance, it turns out that there is such a thing as teaching boys to be too self-sufficient.  I discovered this when both Drew and Porter brought home some sucky grades on their spelling tests.  I was particularly upset since I won the 5th grade spelling bee on the word “linoleum.”

“What’s up with this?” I asked.  “Why didn’t you tell me you had a test?  I would help you study.”

“Why would we tell you?” Drew asked.

“You would help us study?” Porter asked.

Then I realized that I’ve focused so much on having them do things for themselves that it never occurred to them to ask for help.  The last couple of months I’ve been on them like a flea on a dog asking about spelling tests, and I give them each a fake test.  They write the words they miss three times each and then are tested again.

They may not be able to spell linoleum but they are improving.

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One year ago in My Tiny Kingdom: Albert Einstein Needs Love, Too

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Don’t forget that this week’s Flashback Friday theme is Love, Look At The 2 Of Us.  For instructions on how to participate, see here.

Posted by Anne Glamore @ 9:22 amBoys: Demented & Dangerous,Let's Eat: Meals and Recipes,Mom11 comments  

January 29, 2009

Flashback Friday: Best Bathing Suit Ever!

I’ve seen some wild bathing suits in my time, but I never expected to see one on my mom.  So when I found this picture, I was delighted.

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(click to enlarge)

This was taken in April 1971, and I had just turned 4. More impressively for my mom, Aunt Su had just turned 1. She didn’t get to party with my mom in her chain bikini, although I did.

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I’m calling it a chain bikini, but I bet the purpose of the chains was so that she could tell my very Southern grandmother that of course she was wearing a one piece bathing suit at the beach, and why would she think otherwise?

My sisters and I worshiped the Jackie O glasses so much that I still have them.  They’ve traveled to 70’s parties around the country.  They may not be worth much money, but they are full of memories.

The hat though, looks like a refurbished pinata.

I published some thoughts and pictures of my mother when she died.  I don’t know if I mentioned it then, but one thing people said, and still say, is that she was such a classy lady.  It’s good to know that she let her wild side show through when she got away at the beach.  I bet people would pay good money for a view of that get-up from the rear.

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Three years ago in My Tiny Kingdom: Operation Acne Attack
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Join in with your flashback!


1. Pendy (beach 1984)
2. Andi (my friend Tracy)
3. Headless Mom-Not so funny
4. JanMary, N Ireland
5. Kim (Observations from an Earthroamer)
6. Wake Forest Mama (Beach)
7. Holly (In My Overactive Head)
8. Christina
9. Pyzahn
10. Rebecca (Steelers)
11. Marissa (Family Pictures from the 80\’s)
12. Quirky is a Compliment (on high school hair)
13. Sir Nottaguy-Imadad

Powered by… Mister Linky’s Magical Widgets.

Posted by Anne Glamore @ 9:09 pmBlast From the Past,Flashback Friday,Mom17 comments  

October 26, 2008

Sunday Extra: 3 Weeks of Menus

You know I love to cook and regard the family dinner as a sacred time, although the combination of immature jokes (“Hey Mom- spell icup!”) and constant reminders (“Boys– use your napkins, not your shirts.  Finn, don’t steal Porter’s milk.  Get up and refill yours.  I’m not raising thieves.”) results in the most chaotic part of our day.  But I have high hopes that some day all of us will sit at the table and all elbows and napkins and condiments will be in their proper places, and we will have conversations that aren’t punctuated by audible farts, or center on jokes in which we are asked to name the word that starts with “f” and ends with “uck.” (Answer below for those of you who don’t have ten and twelve-year-olds.)++

I don’t see any end to our nightly Hearing on Who Gets Dessert, in which Bill sits as judge, each boy represents himself and makes an argument outlining the reasons he is entitled to Cookies N Cream ice cream, and I serve as adviser to all parties, reminding them of crucial arguments (“Tell him: Your Honor, a look at the evidence will make it clear that I have tasted each food on my plate and consumed seconds of pork.”)

I’ve been slammed at work lately and thus have been even more in need of easy recipes than usual.  The last couple of weeks I turned to Simply Recipes to find some winners and I’ve become a devotee of the site.  I heard Elise Bauer speak at BlogHer and recognized her beautiful site, but it wasn’t until Playgroupie raved about a Carnitas recipe that I really checked it out.

Here are several recipes that were hits with my family.  Some, like the Carnitas, I prepared in the crock pot a day ahead.  Most of the others were so easy that I did them the day of, prepping ingredients when I picked the boys up from school and cooking later.  The Shrimp Fried Rice was so basic that I made the rice a day ahead so It could dry in the refrigerator, then left Bill and the boys to make it while I enjoyed a girls’ night out.

I’ve divided this into three weeks of menus to make it easier on you so that you can do all your shopping today or tomorrow for the week.  I’ve also added two recipes of my own.  It’s the last week to make Jack-O-Lantern Pie, which The Voice Of Reason and I have been making for years.  It’s no great shakes from a culinary standpoint for my artichoke-loving boys, but it’s a tradition.

It’s officially freezing to me here, now that the temperatures are in the high 50’s and low 60’s.  If I were to move as far north as Nashville I might well die of hypothermia. Bill requested a soup or stew, so I’ll be making Sausage and Lentil Stew which is a snap and healthy as well.  It’s easy to freeze or take to work for a quick lunch.

Feel free to mix or match these menus; I’ve just tried to provide a good mix of chicken, meat and fish each week.  (The Simply Recipes dishes are marked with a *):

WEEK 1:

Jack-O-Lantern Pie (from the post Food, Glorious Food, which includes pictures of the pie and, for reasons I have forgotten, Brad Pitt.)

*Dad’s Fish Stew (the clam juice is above the tuna at the grocery.  For economic reasons I used catfish and tilapia which were cheaper fish.  Be sure and serve with bread to sop up the juice. )

*Sweet & Sour Chicken (super-easy, and don’t freak out when you mix up the sauce that seems odd and ends up perfect.  Be sure and read her tips about using a very hot pan.)

*Pot Roast (Of course everyone already has a pot roast recipe but sometimes it’s nice to try a new one.  I did it in the crock pot.)

WEEK 2:

Sausage and Lentil Stew (recipe below)

*Chipotle Meatballs (Remember how my Beef Balls were such a hit?  This is a great update. Sorry that you have to skim through the details of the family doorknob/fart game to get to the actual recipe.)

*Pasta With Tuna, Arugula & Hot Pepper (I know– this sounds weird!  But it’s fabulous, I’m guessing because you use fresh garlic and oil-packed tuna.  I used spinach instead of arugula.)

*Chicken Marinara (to make this even easier you could buy a jar of Newman’s marinara sauce and use that instead of making the tomato sauce!)

WEEK 3:

*Carnitas (these are fancy tacos.  The boys prefer flour tortillas, so I used some corn and some flour.  Publix has black beans that are seasoned, so we drain those and add them to the taco.  Don’t eliminate the step where you put the meat in the oven to crisp it up.  Delish.)

*Chicken, Mushrooms & Tomatoes with Port Wine (this would be a good Election Special dinner; follow it with the always popular Multi-Tasking Ice Cream Pie and plenty of wine and settle in for the night.  If you don’t have Port, you can buy some very cheap or use red wine.  This would be good with green beans, or brussels sprouts sauteed with garlic and bacon, or zucchini sliced thin and sauteed with sliced almonds and topped with some Parmesan, salt and pepper a la the Red Cat restaurant in NYC.)

Remember – don’t freak out if you can’t find everything.  You can use an onion instead of shallots or dump in a can of diced tomatoes if those at your market aren’t beautiful, as I did.  The point is to end up with edible food.

* Shrimp Fried Rice (the boys did not leave me any to sample.  That speaks volumes.)

Oops.  I am missing a recipe here.  You can check out my recipe posts by clicking on the “Let’s Eat” category in the left sidebar.  Or to make it easier, I’ve compiled several right here:

Food, Glorious Food

Week O’ Recipes

Let Me Organize You, One Meal At A Time

Sausage and Lentil Stew:

6 oz smoked turkey sausage (I use more)

1.5 cups thinly sliced leek

2 cloves garlic, minced

3/4 cup dried lentils

2 10.5 oz cans chicken broth

1 tsp dried thyme (I add some fresh, too)

1/2 tsp sugar

1/4 tsp Tabasco

2 14.5 cans diced tomatoes undrained

Slice sausage into 1/2 inch slices and cut each in half.  Brown lightly in a skillet.  Add leeks, garlic, and cook 3 mins.  Add lentils and broth and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer 30 mins.  Stir in thyme and remaining ingredients and bring to a boil.  Cover, reduce heat and simmer 15 mins or until lentils are tender.  6 cups.

(I thought I got this from Cooking Light, which I frequently use, but I’ve searched all over their web site and cannot find it.)

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Answer to immature joke:

++ FIRETRUCK

(and you did spell “icup” out loud, didn’t you?)
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My mom died three years ago today.  I’m holding it together okay so far.  This is a picture of her in 1976, when she was 35 years old.    This is the exact way I remember my mom looking when I was growing up.
youngmomfor blog

Posted by Anne Glamore @ 1:01 pmLet's Eat: Meals and Recipes,Mom18 comments  


Welcome to the Kingdom

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I'm Anne Glamore, wife, mother, lawyer and blogger. I have three boys, and I'm desperately trying to train them to become Southern gentlemen, but that may be an unrealistic goal. At this point I'd be ecstatic if they'd quit farting at the dinner table. If you're new here, check out the Readers' Favorite Posts below or browse through the Categories. I write about my attempts to teach the boys about peckers and sex (which we call "making googly eyes"), my struggles with hepatitis C and spine surgery, the boys' adventures with fire and pets, my mom's death from ovarian cancer, my love of cooking (with plenty of recipes) and anything else that crosses my mind. Join me on Twitter or StumbleUpon or Email me. I'm happy to speak to your group or club.

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